Fruit Trees for Fort Collins

You know that fruit trees thrive in Colorado if you’ve ever had a peach from Palisade. We grow fruit trees specifically designed for the climate and soils of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado and Southern Wyoming. Even so, some fruit trees need to be planted in areas where they will be sheltered from our drying winds. Although peaches like you find in Palisade don’t grow well here (we have late spring frosts which can hurt the fruit), we have varieties of apple, plum, apricot, and cherry that bear delicious fruit. Tell us what you’re interested in and about the location you’d like to plant your fruit tree, and we’ll help you make the right choice.

PIONEER-APRICOT

Pioneer Apricot
Prunus armerniaca ‘Pioneer’


Height: 10 – 15 feet
Spread: 10 – 15 feet
Shape: Broad Rounded
Zone: 4
Fruit: Clingstone

A late blooming apricot better suited for climates prone to late spring frosts. Its golden fruits have a reddish blush and are sweet, firm and juicy. These trees bear young and heavily. Called a “sweet pit” apricot as its pit is edible and tastes of almonds. Beautiful orange yellow fall colored leaves make it useful as an ornamental tree as well.


RED-DELICIOUS-APPLE

Red Delicious Apple
Malus ‘Delicious’


Height: 15-20 feet
Spread: 10 – 15 feet
Shape: Broad Rounded
Zone: 5
Fruit: Red striped

This is a very popular eating apple with a long history of production. Its resistance to fire blight is the reason that it is one of the few apples we grow. The apples ripen late in the fall. This tree needs a pollinator so one would need to find a suitable tree with the same bloom time.


MESABI-CHERRY

Mesabi Cherry
Prunus ‘Mesabi’


Height: 15 – 20 feet
Spread: 12 – 15 feet
Shape: Rounded
Zone: 4
Flower: White

This cherry tree is a cross between a Bing cherry and a Montmorency Cherry. The fruit’s sugar content is high enough to enjoy eating right off the tree that typically ripens in July. Birds love the fruit so there is no mess but, if you intend to harvest the fruit, bird deterrents must be put in place. This tree is self-fertile so no pollinator is needed.


STANLEY-PLUM

Stanley Plum
Prunus ‘Stanley’


Height: 10-15 feet
Spread: 10-15 feet
Shape: Broad Rounded
Zone: 5
Fruit: Blue, Semi-freestone

This is the most popular prune plum. It produces large deep bluish-purple fruit that is firm and sweet. Trees are vigorous, hardy, early bearing and produce large crops. The semi-freestone fruit is great for canning or eating. Though Stanley is self-fertile the best results are achieved using a pollinator. The fruit ripens mid to late-season. (Self-pollinating)


MONTMERCY-CHERRY

Montmercy Cherry
Prunus ‘Montmorency’


Height: 15-20 feet
Spread: 12-15 feet
Shape: Rounded
Zone: 4
Flower: White

This pie cherry is a self-pollinating French selection that ripens in late June to early July. The fruit is very tart, but makes excellent preserves and cherry pie. Birds love the fruit so there is no mess, but, if you intend to harvest, bird deterrents must be put in place. It is a tree that can also be used for its ornamental appeal.